Marc's WhiteWater Gear Reviews

Sleeping

Backpacking

Lunar Solo tent

This is my Six Moon Designs Lunar Solo tent. The ultimate solo tent if it comes down to weight, practicality, functionality and comfort. This ultra lightweight (740 grams/26 OZ) tent has plenty of room and all the functional specs you need.
It’s low profile handles wind well, whilst being steep enough to not hold snow. This tent is kept upright by a single 124,5 cm (49″) (preferably Carbon fiber pole (I have the aluminium pole) or trekking pole and a 8 Stakes.
The sleeping area is a 6-inch deep bathtub floor, topped by 6 inches of mesh, which ensures excellent ventilation while keeping me separated from low canopy walls. This keeps you drier on those occasions when condensation forms on the canopy. The vestibule is set on the long side of the tent to maximize views and ventilation when fully open.
The floor space is a generous 2.4 m2 (26.25 ft2) being 122x229cm.
The triangular outside storage space is almost 1 m2 (8.5 ft2).
It all results in a 810 grams weighing 28×11,5cm package, plus the folded 51grams pole at 44 x 2,5cm.
It is constructed with 100% Silicone coated Polyester material reducing fabric stretch and packed volume. The Canopy is constructed from 20D material while the floor utilizes a more durable 40D weave. I got the tent with the DIY Seam Grip + Sil (SilNet) set and a 34grams Polycro footprint.
If you are as lazy and spoiled like me: Order it with the full Seam Sealing Service treatment. It is likely to be done neater and better by experienced hands than by doing it yourself.

Here are some practical experiences learned by using this tent:

  • A very light and durable tent. Takes very little time to pitch (an average of 3 minutes).
  • I had NO condensation issues, even though I sometimes pitched really low (meaning there was no mesh gap left on the wind side of the tent.
  • Personally, I will probably treat the floor with silicon(spray?) to make it less slippery.
  • I only carried one walking/wading pole, which meant I had to use the aluminium pole or not leave my tent pitched, when I did day trips.
  • Each half of the vestibule is connected to the front guyline by a webbing loop, they go into a single plastic hook that slides over the guyline by use of a prusikknot. Getting the webbing loops into the hook (and make them stay there) isn’t easy.
    Easy fix: attach two 2mm chord loops to the webbing.
  • If pitched on uneven ground with it’s back turned into the wind, and if you’d like to lay your head higher than your feet and at the side with the opening: Then only half the pitching spots are usable, due to the tent opening on one side.
  • The tent took a real beating in Scotland with very very strong winds, which made the backpanel cave/bend in a lot. The pounding wind loosened the webbing guy-lines during the night and it bent the aluminium pole. (Which I might replace by a carbon pole.)
    Mind you, this tent was designed as a 3 season tent, to be used with a walking pole, and I guess, with trail walking in mind. Knowing that, exposure to these extreme winds might have been an unfair tasks for this little tent.


Highland Sleeping Bag

This is my Skandika Highlander sleeping bag.
The temperature ratings are: Comfort -2° C / Limit -9° C / Extreme -27° C
Assuming it’s name was chosen carefully, I used this bag during the winter in the most north western part of the Highlands, and it stood it’s grounds.
This bag kept me warm at -5° C. In much colder conditions than that, I used a polartec lining. It’s hood and collar provide good protection and warmth. I had no condensation, dampness or other moist related issues, this being a polyester filled bag. It comes with a compression bag. At 2.2 kg, this isn’t lightest, nor is it smallest packing bag, and the zipper has to be used carefully. But, other than that, this bag is a great choice considering it’s outstanding performance in light freezing conditions, and it’s very affordable.


Red Trek Ultralight Sleeping Pad

My Skandika Red Trek Ultralight Sleeping Pad, is a lighter weight (790gr) and pretty compact pad packed. It’s isolation- and self-inflation capabilities are limited in real cold conditions, but it lays very comfortable. I strongly believe, though, that my sleeping bag (and optional liner) should keep me warm, not my pad.
A sleeping pad should lay comfortable, and this one does! It’s that simple.


Mosquito Net

(stock image, temporary)

I use the Brettschneider Outdoor nets. A Polyester mosquito net with nylon floor, so it protects me from crawling and flying insects. The wedge shape saves space and weight. The net is attached to branches above the head, for example. The entry has a long zipper. Width 0,9m, length 2,1m and is height 1m, at 400 grams.


Basecamp & Car camping

Gotland 4 Tent

My Skandika Gotland is a 4 person tent that I use for longer stay Kayaking Basecamps. It has loads of room, usable as a well-ventilated drying room, spacious storage room, roomy team hangout, whatever. The many options with regards to configurations are great. Doors at 3 sides, a dividable sleeping compartment, windows with plenty of options, bathtub floor. This tent has all it takes for the targeted use, at a very affordable price.


Mosquito Net

(stock image, temporary)

I use the Brettschneider Fine Mesh Big Box. A chemical-free mosquito fine net, keeping the smallest insects out mechanically, mosquitoes, sand flies and midges. Over 1000 mesh per square inch. 100% polyamide, raw white. Closed all around. Width 2m, length 2,2m and is height 2.4m, at 510 grams.


Vegas Flannel Sleeping Bag

These extra wide Skandika Vegas Flannel sleeping bags, are three season+ capable and pretty luxurious. I see these as bags with a large usage ‘window’ with regards to temperature. They are, imho, very well suited for mountain use, with chilly evenings (used as a quilt/blanket), cold nights and chilly mornings. During the day, they serve as picknick blanket.
You cant go wrong with these very affordable and comfortable bags.